More TikTokers Try To Prove Fake Snow Conspiracy And It’s Still Not Working

More TikTokers Try To Prove Fake Snow Conspiracy And It's Still Not Workingsarahmojo/TikTok

While millions of Texans are still left battling freezing temperatures without heating or water, the conspiracy theories just keep on coming, and now they’ve made their way onto TikTok.

Conspiracy theorists claim the cold snap, which has led to the death of more than 30 people, was engineered by the United States government.

In an attempt to try and prove their claims, TikTokers have been sharing videos of themselves trying to melt balls of snow with a lighter, and even a hairdryer, only for it not to melt.

It goes without saying that these bizarre claims are completely baseless, and in actual fact, it’s completely normal for snow to react in this way, despite the TikToker’s attempts to claim it’s abnormal.

As explained by Insider, solid snow actually turns into gas rather than liquid, through a process called sublimation.

But it’s not just TikTok where completely unfounded claims are being made about supposed ‘fake snow’ and the likes. President Joe Biden has also faced ridiculous accusations from far-right conspiracy group QAnon, which claims he helped China create a mass blackout in the southern state.

Meanwhile, just like with the global vaccination programme, many have linked the big freeze back to Microsoft mogul Bill Gates, who previously donated to a Harvard climate project that will look into ways to dim the sun in a bid to slow climate change.

Lots of people all over the internet are citing this experiment has being one of the reasons for the deep freeze, despite the fact it hasn’t even begun yet.

In one post, which has since been deleted from Twitter, one theorist shared a video of someone attempting to burn a ball of snow, writing, ‘Thank you, Bill Gates, for trying to f*cking trick us that this is real snow. You’ll see it’s not melting, and it’s going to burn.’

Sadly, the misinformation and fake news is spreading rapidly, with the hashtag #governmentsnow having more than a million views.

Although TikTok hasn’t commented on this particular trend, it’s no secret that the app has struggled to keep on top of the spread of misinformation on the video-sharing site.

The official community guidelines for TikTok state that ‘misinformation related to emergencies that induces panic’ is banned.

Conspiracy theories are unhelpful for the millions of people who battling to survive in temperatures as low as -18C, without clean running water or electricity.

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